Detroit Pistons Draft: Evaluating the All-Atlantic 10 team

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The Atlantic 10 Conference boasts several NBA players, although, with the exception of Steph Curry, none of them are stars, let alone superstars. It is definitely a place of talent the Detroit Pistons should look at as you never know when you will find the next diamond in the rough.

However, when it comes to a second-round pick, you don’t go in expecting to draft a franchise cornerstone – you look for a consistent role player or bench leader.

Besides, avoiding certain schools because they don’t have a reputation for producing NBA stars is a silly way to conduct a draft and rebuild. (see Rodman, Dennis)

Drafting from mid-major conferences is sometimes one of the better ways to find hidden talent at a low price. Kawhi Leonard, Steph Curry, Gordon Hayward, and Kendrick Nunn (undrafted) are all either stars or up and comers, who had success at smaller schools.

The All-A10 team is full of potential NBA talent, many of who should fall and could be used by one of Detroit’s three second-round picks.

The A-10 announced their all-conference teams and included, for whatever reason, six players on the first team. Unusually, their Defensive Player of the Year was included on the second team, but he will be still be placed on this list.

Here is a look at the Atlantic 10 first team members, and defensive player of the year, and analyzing their chances of helping the Detroit Pistons:

Jordan Goodwin, Guard, Saint Louis

Jordan Goodwin is only six-foot-three, but has averaged over 10 rebounds per game in his last two seasons at Saint Louis. He can also swipes two steals a night and scores nearly 15 points.

However, he also gives away almost three turnovers a games. Oh, and he’s also a terrible free throw shooter.

The pros are numerous, but so are the cons. There is nothing Goodwin does mediocre, he is either really good or really bad.

The Billiken is athletic, an adequate defender, and can out rebound any forward in the league. He plays well off the ball too, which is a skill that other players have to develop, before they can make a real impact.

However, he doesn’t take the smartest shots and weirdly struggles to score in the paint. His two steals a game comes at the cost of gambling too much, giving up easy points.

He was a very good college player, but he is not the guy Detroit should use a second-round pick on unless there is no clear option with their final pick.

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